Review of ‘The Body in the Library’ (Agatha Christie)

Body in the Library

Image from Goodreads

The Body in the Librarya woman dies, and someone tries to find out who killed her.

I’m on a bit of an Agatha Christie roll recently. I’ve just finished The Body in the Library, and have just started The Mirror Crack’d from Side to Side. One of the things I love about Christie is the near impossibility to guess the outcome of some (read: most) of her works. The Body in the Library is no different, and though not my favourite Christie novel by some way, it was entertaining enough to be a page turner and interesting, a good diversion, but not a complete occupier as some Christie stories are.

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The Murdering Vicar

From Goodreads
From Goodreads

I have been a fan of the TV shows Endeavour and Lewis for some years, but for some reason have never seen-or read-an Inspector Morse mystery. As a mystery, Colin Dexter’s Service of All the Dead was intriguing, and I particularly liked the way the characters of Morse and Lewis were brought across. Two deaths, both deceased men are from the same Oxford church. One murdered, one apparent suicide. Chance leads to renowned police officer Inspector Morse taking another look at the original police findings, and trying to shed some new light on the case.

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Review of ‘The Hollow’ (Agatha Christie)

From CommonsIn keeping with last week’s review of Arthur Conan Doyle’s The Hound of the Baskervilles I this week reviewed another detective novel. One murder with a seemingly obvious criminal, yet deeper examination shows discrepancies. Christie stated in her autobiography that she had had second thoughts about Poirot’s involvement. I enjoyed the book a great deal, and disagree with Christie’s view (though Poirot is absent from most of the story)-there are several suspects, motives for everyone, everyone seems to be trying to throw off the police-just how I like a detective fiction.

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Review of ‘The Hound of the Baskervilles’ (Arthur Conan Doyle)

From CommonsSometimes there’s a novel that you just know is a classic, regardless of reviews or era, the quality of the text, the story, and the development of the plot makes a book an instant hit, either with an individual or a group. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s The Hound of the Baskervilles is such a story. One of Doyle’s best, with vivid imagery, tense drama, and lively action, The Hound of the Baskervilles has something for everyone, and as such, is one of the most recognised book titles ever-behind perhaps The Bible in scale. 

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